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Everyone is Everybody Else


Fact File


Released 1974
Label Polydor
Catalogue Number 833 448-2
Producer Rodger Bain
Recorded when: 1974
Recorded where: Olympic Studios, London

Track Listing


Track Title Time Written By Rating
1 Child of the Universe 5.02 John Lees 7.50
2 Negative Earth 5.28 Les Holroyd/Mel Pritchard 6.75
3 Paper Wings 4.14 Les Holroyd/ Mel Pritchard 7.25
4 The Great 1974 Mining Disaster 4.35 John Lees 7.25
5 Crazy City 4.05 Les Holroyd 7.00
6 See Me See You 4.32 John Lees 7.00
7 Poor Boy Blues 3.05 Les Holroyd 7.25
8 Mill Boys 2.47 John Lees 7.00
9 For No One 5.08 John Lees 8.00
  Total 38.56   65.00


Average Rating 7.22

 
Composer Songs Time Total Points Average
John Lees 5 22.04 36.75 7.35
Les Holroyd 4 16.52 28.25 7.06

Personal Review

The wonderful thing about this album is that all the songs seem to drift into each other. There is such a oneness and such a togetherness that a textured layer of sound gives one of the most satisfying feelings from an BJH album.

The characteristic guitar passages blend beautifully with keyboard and some haunting melodies. For me this album marked the beginning of the band's move away from classical orientated rock to a more simplistic style. This is something I was never happy with but it does show messrs Lees and Holroyd at the peak of their songwriting. It is a wonderfully evocative album that still sounds fresh.

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